paulPaul Tankersley, MSN, BSN, RN, OCN

Paul Tankerlsey has been a nurse for 10+ years, and is employed as the Director of Infection Prevention and Control nurse in Houston medical center in an LTAC setting. Clinical experience includes Joint Commission facility survey leadership preparation, program and policy restructuring for medical/surgical, intensive care, renal and hepatic transplant, and infection prevention. Program physician liaison program to ensure patient, nurse, and physician communication focuses on care without time delays or errors.

Paul is currently finished his MSN Healthcare Policy program at Chamberlain University. Paul completed the RN to BSN bridge program at Galen College of Nursing San Antonio, currently serving as a public spokesperson. Paul is on the advisory board for program curriculum for CHCP (College for Health Care Professionals), a partner with NAA. Paul has created multiple partnerships between higher learning organizations, healthcare corporations, and healthcare advocacy groups to decrease education costs and build strong advocacy partnerships.

The past year of my life has been crazy. This past year has proven to be a real challenge. As a full time nurse and nursing student, I have an over-whelming number of assignments, duties, and tasks to keep up with on a daily basis. Add in 12 hour clinicals 3 days a week, there is very little downtime in my life. Just a ton on my plate until school is finished but I wouldn’t trade my life for anything less.

Infection prevention and control has changed my life, and I love being a nurse. It is the most rewarding career. There are so many opportunities for nurses whether it is at the bedside, in the clinic, on the unit, in the classroom, or leading. Going to school has been a real blessing in my life. I enjoy working with other students as a team to complete our education which is one of the exciting things about going to school. I am anxious to finish my current degree program and to get started in my next adventure as an advance practice nurse.

NAA Today Blog

Hospitals Fail To Protect Nursing Staff From Becoming Patients

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      Daniel-Zwerdling  NPR, Special Series, Injured Nurses

      Updated February 25, 20155:09 PM ET

   

 When Tove Schuster raced to help a fellow nurse lift a patient  at Crozer-Chester Medical Center near Philadelphia in March 2010, she didn't realize she was about to become a troubling statistic.

While working the overnight shift, she heard an all-too-common cry: "Please, I need help. My patient has fallen on the floor."

The patient was a woman who weighed more than 300 pounds. So Schuster did what nursing schools and hospitals across the country teach: She gathered a few colleagues, and they lifted the patient as a team.

"I had her legs — a corner of one of the legs, anyway," says Schuster, who was 43 years old at the time. "And as we swung her up onto the bed, I felt something pop. And I went 'ooo.' "

She finished the shift in pain and drove straight home to bed.

But after Schuster woke up late that afternoon, her husband, Matt, heard her shouting. He says he ran to the bedroom and found her crawling across the floor. "I thought it was a joke at first," he says. "And she says, 'I can't walk.' "

Schuster had injured her back moving the patient, which the hospital acknowledged. And today, X-rays of her back show how a surgeon repaired a damaged disk in her spine using a metal cage and four long, sharp screws.

"I can finally walk and sit again without being in excruciating pain," Schuster says. "But the career I had as a floor nurse is over."

According to surveys by the Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), there are more than 35,000 back and other injuries among nursing employees every year, severe enough that they have to miss work.

Nursing assistants and orderlies each suffer roughly three times the rate of back and other musculoskeletal injuries as construction laborers.

In terms of sheer number of these injuries, BLS data show that nursing assistants are injured more than any other occupation, followed by warehouse workers, truckers, stock clerks and registered nurses.

The number one reason why nursing employees get these injuries is by doing their everyday jobs of moving and lifting patients.

Follow the link to read the rest of the article.

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